Video 23 Apr 264,223 notes

companioncubette:

zenpencils:

ERICA GOLDSON: Graduation speech

HOLY. SHIT. THIS IS MY ENTIRE LIFE.

Photo 23 Apr 1,100 notes 
Marcel Duchamp, Rotorelief (Disques Optiques), 1935.

Marcel Duchamp, Rotorelief (Disques Optiques), 1935.

(Source: design-is-fine)

via Vacum.
Photo 23 Apr 74,124 notes
Photo 22 Apr 88 notes pocinmusichistory:

Berlin Philharmonic’s first Black conductor

“At a concert this week in Berlin, Berlin’s famed 65-year-old Philharmonic Orchestra was led by a U.S. war correspondent in battledress. Besides being a war correspondent, the guest conductor was a Negro, born in British Guiana. The 2,000 Berliners and the 500 Allied soldiers in the audience found it quite an experience. They applauded warmly when the conductor led the orchestra through Weber’s familiar Oberon and Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique. They broke into cheers, and called him back five times, when he gave them Berlin’s first hearing of fellow-Negro William Grant Still’s boisterous, bluesy Afro-American Symphony. Slender, serious Rudolph Dunbar is no musical freshman. He studied at Manhattan’s Julliard School, has several times conducted the London Philharmonic. He was in Berlin as correspondent for the Associated Negro Press of Chicago. Shortly before the Berlin Philharmonic’s Conductor Leo Borchard was accidentally killed by U.S. sentries, he had invited Dunbar to guest-conduct. U.S. occupation authorities were all for it, though their interest was more in teaching the Germans a lesson in racial tolerance than in Dunbar’s musicianship.”The news story above was published in Time on September 10, 1945 when the career of Rudolph Dunbar was at its peak. Dunbar lived for another forty-three years, but what happened in those years to the first Black musician to conduct the Berlin and London Philharmonic Orchestras is a mystery. The story starts at the turn of the last century in British Guiana (now Guyana). The date of Dunbar’s birth is variously given as 1902 or 1907, and classical music was an unlikely career for a Black Guyanese boy at that time. But the young Dunbar’s interest was sparked by hearing transcriptions of Wagner and Elgar played in Georgetown by the British Guiana Militia Band. He joined the Militia Band as an apprentice clarinettist at the age of 14, and stayed with them for five years. 

His talent was such that he left the band when he was 19 to study at the Institute of Musical Art (now the Juilliard) in New York, and lived in the city until he graduated in 1925. His subjects at the Juilliard were composition, clarinet and piano, but he was also active in the Harlem jazz scene, and was clarinet soloist on recordings by The Plantation Orchestra(photo above). While in New York he became a friend and champion of the African-American composer William Grant Still, and their correspondence is held today at the University of Arkansas. In 1925 Dunbar moved to Paris as a post-graduate, studying conducting with Philippe Gaubert(below), and composition with Paul Vidal and clarinet with Louis Cahuzac. He also spent time with Felix Weingartner in Vienna. Dunbar’s reputation as a clarinettist grew, and reached the widow of Claude Debussy who invited him to give a private recital in her apartment in 1930 for members of the Paris Conservatoire. 

Dunbar moved to London in 1931 to work as a music critic, and he also started the first ever clarinet school, which attracted students from around the world. His reputation was such that in 1939 he was commissioned to write a textbook on the clarinet, and his Treatise on the Clarinet (Boehm System) became the standard reference work for the instrument. It remained in print though ten editions, and today commands high prices as a collectors item. Dunbar remained active as a jazz musician, and in the 1930s in Britain he led two jazz groups, the All British Coloured Band (also known as the Rumba Coloured Orchestra), and Rudolph Dunbar and his African Polyphony, and made pioneering recordings of West Indian music with both these groups. He also composed, and his 1938 ballet score Dance of the Twenty-First Century (described by Dunbar as ‘ultra modern’), which was written for the famous Cambridge University Footlights Club, was broadcast nationally by NBC with the composer conducting. The outbreak of war in Europe opened up conducting opportunities for Dunbar, and in 1942 he led the London Philharmonic in the Royal Albert Hall in a concert that was described at the time as a fund-raiser for “Britain’s coloured allies”. He wrote for the Associated Negro Press of Chicago, and this gave him credentials as a war correspondent in Europe. He took part in the Normandy Landings with a Black regiment, and was the first foreigner to conduct a symphony orchestra in Paris after it was liberated, and then went on to conduct in Berlin. 

In 1945 Dunbar presented a Festival of American Music in the Théatre des Champs Elysees, Paris with the Conservatoire Orchestra and pianist Jeanne-Marie Darré. The programme included the premiere of In Memoriam: The Colored Soldiers Who Died for Democracy by William Grant Still (right),as well as Still’s Afro-American Symphony. The following year Dunbar made his US conducting debut with the Hollywood Bowl Symphony in a programme that again included Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony. In other concerts he programmed the music of the Afro-British composer Samuel Coleridge Taylor(photo below). Dunbar was a pioneering activist against racism. When asked at his US debutif he would settle in the country he replied: “I think I will make my home in Paris where, if you are good, they will applaud you whether you are pink, white or black, and if you are bad they will whistle at you.” But he was also supportive of the US, and objected to the British Government promoting his career for political ends, saying “It is not the British who have done it for me, it is the Americans.”

At the end of the war the promise was immense. Dunbar was established as a leading performer and authority on the clarinet, his conducting career was in the ascendant as concert life restarted, and he was seen as a role-model for West Indians. But the promise wasn’t fulfilled. Dunbar is documented as being the first black conductor of a symphony orchestra in Poland (1959), and Russia (1964), both concerts were in Soviet bloc countries at the peak of the Cold War. He promoted concerts for the Jamaican Hurricane Relief Fund in 1951, and toured British Guiana in the 1950s conducting the country’s Militia Band, Philharmonic Orchestra and a youth choir. Rudolph Dunbar died in London in June 1988. Were Dunbar’s conducting talents simply eclipsed by de-Nazified conductors returning to the podium after the war, or were there other reasons why the promise wasn’t fulfilled? Exactly what happened remains a mystery, but there are some tantalising clues. Dunbar’s brief obituary in the Musical Times says: 'He gradually withdrew from public life, and devoted himself to fighting racism and trying to increase black involvement in Western art music.But there seems to be more to it than a gradual withdrawal from public life. It is known that Dunbar conducted the BBC Symphony Orchestra. One of the leading authorities on music in Guyana is Dr Vibert C. Cambridge at Ohio University, and in an article for the Stabroek News in Guyana in August 2004 Dr Cambridge quotes from an interview Rudolph Dunbar gave six months before his death in 1988: “Dunbar spoke about the particular vindictiveness of a producer/director of music at the BBC who derailed his musical career in Europe. Dunbar described that director of music as “despicable and vile” and the BBC “as stubborn as mules and ruthless as rattlesnakes”.
Today Rudolph Dunbar (left) is remembered as a one of a pioneering group of West Indians who fought racism in the UK. The musician who was the first Black conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, and who wrote a standard reference work on the clarinet, does not warrant a single mention in the current or earlier editions of the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, or other major music reference books. Why remains a mystery. * 2011 - important Rudolph Dunbar updates, here, here and here. Sources: * Rudolph Dunbar by Dr Vibert C. Cambridge, Stabroek News August 22, 2004 * W. Rudolph Dunbar: Pioneering Orchestra Conductor, The Black Perspective in Music, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Autumn, 1981), pp. 193-225 * Rudolph Dunbar, The Musical Times, Vol. 129, No. 1749 (Nov., 1988), p. 619 * Debut in the Bowl, Time Sept 02 1946 * Rhythm in Berlin, Time Sept 10 1945 * The Pantheon of West Indian Heroes Framed, Black Britain, July 8 2006. * Settling Scores: German Music, Denazification, and the Americans, 1945-1953, by David Monod,NewMusicBox Oct 24 2006. * Listeners to the BBC Radio 4 programme on Rudolph Dunbar broadcast on August 7 2007 should readEchoes of Rudolph Dunbar on the BBC. (c) Bob Shingleton 2007 

pocinmusichistory:

Berlin Philharmonic’s first Black conductor

“At a concert this week in Berlin, Berlin’s famed 65-year-old Philharmonic Orchestra was led by a U.S. war correspondent in battledress. Besides being a war correspondent, the guest conductor was a Negro, born in British Guiana. The 2,000 Berliners and the 500 Allied soldiers in the audience found it quite an experience. They applauded warmly when the conductor led the orchestra through Weber’s familiar Oberon and Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique. They broke into cheers, and called him back five times, when he gave them Berlin’s first hearing of fellow-Negro William Grant Still’s boisterous, bluesy Afro-American Symphony. 

Slender, serious Rudolph Dunbar is no musical freshman. He studied at Manhattan’s Julliard School, has several times conducted the London Philharmonic. He was in Berlin as correspondent for the Associated Negro Press of Chicago. Shortly before the Berlin Philharmonic’s Conductor Leo Borchard was accidentally killed by U.S. sentries, he had invited Dunbar to guest-conduct. U.S. occupation authorities were all for it, though their interest was more in teaching the Germans a lesson in racial tolerance than in Dunbar’s musicianship.”


The news story above was published in Time on September 10, 1945 when the career of Rudolph Dunbar was at its peak. Dunbar lived for another forty-three years, but what happened in those years to the first Black musician to conduct the Berlin and London Philharmonic Orchestras is a mystery. The story starts at the turn of the last century in British Guiana (now Guyana). The date of Dunbar’s birth is variously given as 1902 or 1907, and classical music was an unlikely career for a Black Guyanese boy at that time. But the young Dunbar’s interest was sparked by hearing transcriptions of Wagner and Elgar played in Georgetown by the British Guiana Militia Band. He joined the Militia Band as an apprentice clarinettist at the age of 14, and stayed with them for five years. 

image


His talent was such that he left the band when he was 19 to study at the Institute of Musical Art (now the Juilliard) in New York, and lived in the city until he graduated in 1925. His subjects at the Juilliard were composition, clarinet and piano, but he was also active in the Harlem jazz scene, and was clarinet soloist on recordings by The Plantation Orchestra(photo above). While in New York he became a friend and champion of the African-American composer William Grant Still, and their correspondence is held today at the University of Arkansas

In 1925 Dunbar moved to Paris as a post-graduate, studying conducting with Philippe Gaubert(below), and composition with Paul Vidal and clarinet with Louis Cahuzac. He also spent time with Felix Weingartner in Vienna. Dunbar’s reputation as a clarinettist grew, and reached the widow of Claude Debussy who invited him to give a private recital in her apartment in 1930 for members of the Paris Conservatoire

image

Dunbar moved to London in 1931 to work as a music critic, and he also started the first ever clarinet school, which attracted students from around the world. His reputation was such that in 1939 he was commissioned to write a textbook on the clarinet, and his Treatise on the Clarinet (Boehm System) became the standard reference work for the instrument. It remained in print though ten editions, and today commands high prices as a collectors item. 

Dunbar remained active as a jazz musician, and in the 1930s in Britain he led two jazz groups, the All British Coloured Band (also known as the Rumba Coloured Orchestra), and Rudolph Dunbar and his African Polyphony, and made pioneering recordings of West Indian music with both these groups. He also composed, and his 1938 ballet score Dance of the Twenty-First Century (described by Dunbar as ‘ultra modern’), which was written for the famous Cambridge University Footlights Club, was broadcast nationally by NBC with the composer conducting. 

The outbreak of war in Europe opened up conducting opportunities for Dunbar, and in 1942 he led the London Philharmonic in the Royal Albert Hall in a concert that was described at the time as a fund-raiser for “Britain’s coloured allies”. He wrote for the Associated Negro Press of Chicago, and this gave him credentials as a war correspondent in Europe. He took part in the Normandy Landings with a Black regiment, and was the first foreigner to conduct a symphony orchestra in Paris after it was liberated, and then went on to conduct in Berlin. 

image

In 1945 Dunbar presented a Festival of American Music in the Théatre des Champs Elysees, Paris with the Conservatoire Orchestra and pianist Jeanne-Marie Darré. The programme included the premiere of In Memoriam: The Colored Soldiers Who Died for Democracy by William Grant Still (right),as well as Still’s Afro-American Symphony. The following year Dunbar made his US conducting debut with the Hollywood Bowl Symphony in a programme that again included Grant Still’s Afro-American Symphony. In other concerts he programmed the music of the Afro-British composer Samuel Coleridge Taylor(photo below). 

Dunbar was a pioneering activist against racism. When asked at his US debutif he would settle in the country he replied: “I think I will make my home in Paris where, if you are good, they will applaud you whether you are pink, white or black, and if you are bad they will whistle at you.” But he was also supportive of the US, and objected to the British Government promoting his career for political ends, saying “It is not the British who have done it for me, it is the Americans.”

image

At the end of the war the promise was immense. Dunbar was established as a leading performer and authority on the clarinet, his conducting career was in the ascendant as concert life restarted, and he was seen as a role-model for West Indians. But the promise wasn’t fulfilled. Dunbar is documented as being the first black conductor of a symphony orchestra in Poland (1959), and Russia (1964), both concerts were in Soviet bloc countries at the peak of the Cold War. He promoted concerts for the Jamaican Hurricane Relief Fund in 1951, and toured British Guiana in the 1950s conducting the country’s Militia Band, Philharmonic Orchestra and a youth choir. Rudolph Dunbar died in London in June 1988. 

Were Dunbar’s conducting talents simply eclipsed by de-Nazified conductors returning to the podium after the war, or were there other reasons why the promise wasn’t fulfilled? Exactly what happened remains a mystery, but there are some tantalising clues. Dunbar’s brief obituary in the Musical Times says: 'He gradually withdrew from public life, and devoted himself to fighting racism and trying to increase black involvement in Western art music.

But there seems to be more to it than a gradual withdrawal from public life. It is known that Dunbar conducted the BBC Symphony Orchestra. One of the leading authorities on music in Guyana is Dr Vibert C. Cambridge at Ohio University, and in an article for the Stabroek News in Guyana in August 2004 Dr Cambridge quotes from an interview Rudolph Dunbar gave six months before his death in 1988: 

“Dunbar spoke about the particular vindictiveness of a producer/director of music at the BBC who derailed his musical career in Europe. Dunbar described that director of music as “despicable and vile” and the BBC “as stubborn as mules and ruthless as rattlesnakes”.

image

Today Rudolph Dunbar (left) is remembered as a one of a pioneering group of West Indians who fought racism in the UK. The musician who was the first Black conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, and who wrote a standard reference work on the clarinet, does not warrant a single mention in the current or earlier editions of the Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, or other major music reference books. Why remains a mystery. 

* 2011 - important Rudolph Dunbar updates, herehere and here

Sources: 
Rudolph Dunbar by Dr Vibert C. Cambridge, Stabroek News August 22, 2004 
W. Rudolph Dunbar: Pioneering Orchestra ConductorThe Black Perspective in Music, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Autumn, 1981), pp. 193-225 
Rudolph DunbarThe Musical Times, Vol. 129, No. 1749 (Nov., 1988), p. 619 
Debut in the Bowl, Time Sept 02 1946 
Rhythm in BerlinTime Sept 10 1945 
The Pantheon of West Indian Heroes Framed, Black Britain, July 8 2006. 
Settling Scores: German Music, Denazification, and the Americans, 1945-1953, by David Monod,NewMusicBox Oct 24 2006. 
* Listeners to the BBC Radio 4 programme on Rudolph Dunbar broadcast on August 7 2007 should readEchoes of Rudolph Dunbar on the BBC
(c) Bob Shingleton 2007 

Video 22 Apr 507 notes

therachstarr:

"Any great work of art […] revives and readapts time and space, and the measure of its success is the extent to which it makes you an inhabitant of that world—the extent to which it invites you in and lets you breathe its strange, special air.”

—Leonard Bernstein

Audio 21 Apr 248 notes

classicalliterature:

Rachmaninoff - Isle of the Dead, Op. 29

Isle of the Dead is a symphonic poem composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff. It was inspired by Arnold Böcklin’s painting, Isle of the Dead, which Rachmaninoff saw in Paris in 1907. He concluded the composition while staying in Dresden in 1908.
It is considered a classic example of Russian late-Romanticism of the beginning of the 20th century. The music begins by suggesting the sound of the oars of Charon as they meet the waters of the river Styx. Rachmaninoff then uses a recurring figure in 5/8 time to depict what may be the rowing of the oarsman or the movement of the water, and as in several other of his works, quotes the Dies Irae plainchant, an allusion to death. In contrast to the theme of death, the 5/8 time also depicts breathing, creating a holistic reflection on how life and death are intertwined.

Performed by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Fritz Reiner

Played 251 times. via Chain to the Rhythm.
Video 21 Apr 1,474 notes

childoftherenaissance:

Xavier Dolan

cAn y0u sToP

Quote 21 Apr 5,025 notes
The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper.
— W.B. Yeats (via natural-magics)

(Source: thequotesymposium)

Photo 21 Apr 2,392 notes nevver:

Arya
Video 21 Apr 30,978 notes

augurofsound:

hipnerd:

This is the same man.

what’s his trainers number?

Quote 21 Apr 110 notes
I seem to be having this tremendous difficulty with my lifestyle. As soon as I reach some kind of definite policy about what is my kind of music and my kind of restaurant, and my kind of overdraft, people start blowing up my kind of planet and throwing me out of their kind of spaceships. It’s so hard to build up anything coherent…
— Arthur Dent, from The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide Radio Series (via hitchhikersguidetothegalaxy)

(Source: antiantimatter)

Photo 21 Apr 11,076 notes cesaray:

cersei lannister: a summary

cesaray:

cersei lannister: a summary

Video 21 Apr 15 notes

sillywhatwell:

How is it possible that I’m overwhelmed and underwhelmed by something at the same time?!?!

They want to grow the youth audience for classical music so juxtapose the music with a youth pop culture reference. OK, I get it. But I do often wonder exactly why initiatives such as these seem to want to target the kind of youth audience that watches/listens to Miley Cyrus and Rihanna. I suspect that they are too tough a market to crack. On the other hand, there are plenty of highly educated, intelligent, curious people out there who are not classical music fans but they listen to the smarter end of pop music… like, I dunno, London Grammar or Bjork or Rufus Wainright. Now, I am convinced that if classical music world learnt to effectively communicate with those people, we would increase our audience. Music videos don’t have to be so highly sexualised and vaguely exploitative to be popular. (Gotye+Kimbra anyone?)

Also, it is not only young people who are not listening to classical music. There are plenty of older folk who prefer Jimi Hendrix or The Beatles or Pink Floyd or y’know, the music of their own youth to Beethoven and Mozart. Are those people won over by classical music + soft porn? Only as far as the porn itself. I doubt they’re rushing out to buy Dvorak.

This video is so pathetically off base that I couldn’t even begin to deconstruct how or why

Sally raises some excellent points though

Quote 20 Apr 16,633 notes
Comparing yourself to others is an act of violence against your authentic self.
— Iyanla Vanzant (via wordsthat-speak)
Video 20 Apr 42,903 notes

misandry-mermaid:

thedragonflywarrior:

The head-turning Game of Thrones actress Gwendoline Christie is a towering 6ft 3in tall and admits she often felt she couldn’t relate to women on the big screen because of her Amazonian frame, but is now relishing the opportunity to play a tough, fierce warrior in the medieval fantasy drama.

She said: “It’s really vitally important to me the way women are portrayed. As someone who has always felt at times pretty genderless because of my size, it interests me to challenge ideas of prejudice and femininity, and what it is to be a woman.”

The towering actress reveals that she had numerous setbacks in her career before landing a prized role as Brienne of Tarth in the hit show, adding: “I found it so frustrating, particularly at the beginning, because I would be told, ‘Sorry love, you’re too tall.’ At one stage I was like, ‘I’ll give this another six months and if this persists, ‘I’ll become a nun.’ “

For her role as warrior Brienne, Gwendoline trained how to fight with swords and ride horses and says it’s “empowering” to know she can “break a man’s nose with my elbow.”

"I do all my own stunts and come away with bruises and scratches. After one scene I was absolutely covered in bruises all down one leg and up one arm. But it’s worth it. It’s quite fun. I enjoy knocking around with the boys."

I cannot get enough of this woman. She deserves all the awards.

<3_<3


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