Photo 24 Jul 4,159 notes
Audio 24 Jul 6,691 notes

h-o-r-n-g-r-y:

Heavenly Father || Bon Iver

(Source: asaladaday)

Played 62,804 times. via The Alderist.
Photo 24 Jul 327 notes newyorker:

On the day of Hitler’s suicide, a squad of American soldiers found themselves face to face with the eighty-year-old composer and conductor Richard Strauss. Alex Ross reflects on the story of the encounter: http://nyr.kr/UqKUES

“Why do I find these tales mesmerizing? Perhaps it has to do with the awkward relationship that any child of the postwar American empire has with the old European colossus of classical music. No matter how deeply we bow before it, we feel like intruders, pulling into the driveways of the great composers and threatening them with eviction.”

Photograph by AP.

newyorker:

On the day of Hitler’s suicide, a squad of American soldiers found themselves face to face with the eighty-year-old composer and conductor Richard Strauss. Alex Ross reflects on the story of the encounter: http://nyr.kr/UqKUES

“Why do I find these tales mesmerizing? Perhaps it has to do with the awkward relationship that any child of the postwar American empire has with the old European colossus of classical music. No matter how deeply we bow before it, we feel like intruders, pulling into the driveways of the great composers and threatening them with eviction.”

Photograph by AP.

(Source: newyorker.com)

via Blogthoven.
Video 24 Jul 7,233 notes

conelradstation:

John Coltrane, gunslinger and saint (from Jazz, directed by Ken Burns, 2000)

Video 24 Jul 141 notes
via flavorpill.
Photo 24 Jul 341 notes Wagner

Wagner

(Source: jolieing)

Video 24 Jul 19,879 notes

hobolunchbox:

Daenerys gets burned. 

Video 24 Jul 168,787 notes

vinkunwildflowerqueen:

reinedeboheme:

lexieloveyoulikeacupcake:

When Jack Warner was casting the movie My Fair Lady, Julie Andrews, who played the original Eliza Doolittle on Broadway, was overlook for the part, that was given to Audrey Hepburn.

That made her available to accept Mr. Disney’s invitation to play Mary Poppins.

At the 22nd Golden Globes, when she won the best actress award (she was up against Audrey for My Fair Lady), she had her sweet revenge.

how to shade, with class.

Julie Andrews is the queen of everything

(Source: lejazzhot)

Link 24 Jul 19 notes 'Max Hole is right about the Royal Festival Hall: Tear it down'»

tornamiadir:

I only reluctantly link to Norman Lebrecht’s pitiful excuse for a blog but this ‘article’ really takes the cake. Notwithstanding the customary sensationalist headline and whiffs of Lebrecht’s shameless martyr complex - ‘sometimes I felt like a voice in the wilderness [against] the whole classical establishment’ - his criticism of the Royal Festival Hall is laughable. The Hall admittedly has sub-par acoustics (although the ROH and RAH aren’t exactly shining examples of acoustic engineering either) but this is not Norman’s beef. In support of his complaint he cites Max Hole’s criticism that:

'There were no screens to show the musicians up close, the conductor had his back to you [my bolding], he didn’t speak to you. I thought this was all wrong.’

Since when have Superbowl-esque close-ups of a sweaty violinist been the standard in enhancing the immersive experience of an orchestral concert? Even more bizarrely Lebrecht seems to advocate conductors with eyes in the back of their heads, presumably so they can pay more attention to the audience. I’m all for a brief explanatory introduction by the conductor, but let’s not forget that it’s not just him doing the work. A concert becomes a transcendental experience when all the musicians work together in service of the music, rather than a orchestra as a faceless entity directed by a ‘star’ conductor-spokesman. Lebrecht then adds his own vague and unrelated complaints to the pile (he doesn’t like yellow and brown, poor baby).

The point, however, is less that Lebrecht’s journalism is a joke, and more that Slipped Disc is, according to his About page, the world’s most-read cultural website (possibly because the articles are usually four lines long and require minimal brain power to click on, read and forget), and this is symptomatic of the ineffectuality of wider discussions of ‘classical music and related cultures’. How on earth can we expect to resolve importance issues about the classical music industry and by extension, its perception by the wider world, if this kind of flabby journalism is the norm?

Video 24 Jul 4,233 notes

(Source: judysgarland)

via RELAX.
Video 24 Jul 1,798 notes

"Look, I need you to read and sign the employee manual. Details a lot of the workplace policies. One of them is, um, proper workplace attire."

(Source: spotyoubitch)

Quote 24 Jul 84,955 notes

1. Linguistic Intelligence: the capacity to use language to express what’s on your mind and to understand other people. Any kind of writer, orator, speaker, lawyer, or other person for whom language is an important stock in trade has great linguistic intelligence.

2. Logical/Mathematical Intelligence: the capacity to understand the underlying principles of some kind of causal system, the way a scientist or a logician does; or to manipulate numbers, quantities, and operations, the way a mathematician does.

3. Musical Rhythmic Intelligence: the capacity to think in music; to be able to hear patterns, recognize them, and perhaps manipulate them. People who have strong musical intelligence don’t just remember music easily, they can’t get it out of their minds, it’s so omnipresent.

4. Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence: the capacity to use your whole body or parts of your body (your hands, your fingers, your arms) to solve a problem, make something, or put on some kind of production. The most evident examples are people in athletics or the performing arts, particularly dancing or acting.

5. Spatial Intelligence: the ability to represent the spatial world internally in your mind — the way a sailor or airplane pilot navigates the large spatial world, or the way a chess player or sculptor represents a more circumscribed spatial world. Spatial intelligence can be used in the arts or in the sciences.

6. Naturalist Intelligence: the ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) and sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef.

7. Intrapersonal Intelligence: having an understanding of yourself; knowing who you are, what you can do, what you want to do, how you react to things, which things to avoid, and which things to gravitate toward. We are drawn to people who have a good understanding of themselves. They tend to know what they can and can’t do, and to know where to go if they need help.

8. Interpersonal Intelligence: the ability to understand other people. It’s an ability we all need, but is especially important for teachers, clinicians, salespersons, or politicians — anybody who deals with other people.

9. Existential Intelligence: the ability and proclivity to pose (and ponder) questions about life, death, and ultimate realities.

— Howard Gardner’s seminal Theory of Multiple Intelligences, originally published in 1983, which revolutionized psychology and education by offering a more dimensional conception of intelligence than the narrow measures traditional standardized tests had long applied.  (via versteur)

(Source: )

Video 24 Jul 653,767 notes

corrwill:

ouijasexting:

im fucking crYIN G omfg

I will NEVER not reblog this. ONE OF THE BEST SNL SKITS THEY HAVE EVER DONE!!!

(Source: exoergic)

Video 24 Jul 2,313 notes

Pulp Fiction (1994) / Breaking Bad (2008-2013) visual parallels. (credit)

(Source: gusfringg)

Video 20 Jul 25,286 notes

(Source: cointreaucomfort)


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